#WhoWeAreKE – Wind of Change

“In 1925, my family came to Kenya and I picked just five very important strategic positions from my family and history. If my family didn’t come here then I wouldn’t have what I have, so I’m extra-ordinarily grateful to them for having made that decision to come.”

“In 1925, my family came to Kenya and I picked just five very important strategic positions from my family and history. If my family didn’t come here then I wouldn’t have what I have, so I’m extra-ordinarily grateful to them for having made that decision to come.”

The artist is a member of one of the newest political parties in Kenya. Her father was instrumental to Kenya attaining her independence. She believes in a better Kenya for all

“I never thought of having a Black boyfriend, not because of any racism or thoughts against anyone Black it was just that despite having many Black and Mixed-race friends at school I wasn’t brought up sharing in the culture of Black families.”

There is actually a colonial leftover cultural distinction and it something that I feel is still in my life, that for much for my life I never thought of having a Black boyfriend, not because of any racism or thoughts against anyone Black it was just that despite having many Black and mixed race friends at school I wasn’t brought up sharing in the culture of Black families. In my prep boarding school from the age of 6 to 11 I didn’t feel any difference between anyone in my year or class, we had Indians, Seychellois, Ugandans, Kenyans, Ethiopians and Whites, the first boy I ever held hands with was a Kenyan boy by the name of Stephen, I remember we had the same birthday. In my home life I had just 4 friends growing up, 3 where White and 1 was mixed race. When I turned 11 I was sent to boarding school in the UK where I found only two of the girls at school were back, from Zambia. I couldn’t understand why there were so many White people I wasn’t used to this at all. So my teenage years were made up very much of White people even when came back to Kenya for the holiday looking back I didn’t have many mixed cultural experiences during my teenage years. It was very much what my parents understood and what we mixed with and that was what I was given. My father is White so I grew up with a role model of only White men, and not being deeply familiar with Black Kenyan culture I naturally wasn’t attracted to having an intimate relationship with anyone who I didn’t completely understand. It wasn’t until I began working as a photographer where I mixed deeply and totally with slum and high class Kenyan cultures that I really began to feel part of being really Kenyan.

My Body Map – Wind of Change

“In 1925, my family came to Kenya and I picked just five very important strategic positions from my family and history. If my family didn’t come here then I wouldn’t have what I have, so I’m extra-ordinarily grateful to them for having made that decision to come.”

Yellow signifies my bright personality and outlook on life, in my readings I have learned that the color signifies wisdom and this is the color I felt I wanted to embody to continue my learning in life. There had to be chunks of opposing colors for my hands and my feet, they needed to be complimentary and not opposing as to stand out and they couldn’t all be the same, I needed at least two colors in there, so I chose an earthy orange for grounding and a deep calming blue. From then on the background was something I did quite early on it’s sky blue, and it signifies freedom, space, expansion, and the way I was lying and the way I way my hair is in the wind, the wind of freedom, wind of creativity, and hopeful the wind will send me in the right direction. The butterfly is symbolic of freedom, lightness, positive change, happiness and the flowers connecting to our earth and the symbol of our new political party Democratic Congress of which I’m a founding member. The green and the earth colors signify the ground. Keeping me grounded as I fly through my life. The sparkly things all over the place are the many people that I have met, of different colors all around the world. They are all around me. The pictures, the windows I have put them at the bottom. Where I come from because it is the foundation upon which I have grown out from and it is on top of the earth and I’m growing out from it. This picture symbolizes space, freedom, connectivity with different kinds of people and lots of environment space, landscape and our beautiful country Kenya.

The next picture is what was the most important moment of my childhood? Which was my being cut off from Africa and being sent off to my boarding school in England. It was cold and very foreboding and I was alone. How do I see myself today? I have got my camera as a photojournalist and a photographer showing the truth and stories; I’m a bridge between cultures, a beckon of light, intent for change with the butterfly and inside the light there’s insecurity and difficulties, but there are still a lot of questions and that is the crack in the darkness here. My aspiration as a citizen of Kenya is Utopia; this is what I believe we should all have. A little peace in our hearts because this is where hope comes from and you can’t live this life without hope. So this is the drums beating, people holding hands, forests, rainbows, peace at heart and lots of space for wildlife because this is our heritage. This is my timeline in the middle; this is who I am so it is inside of me and it goes to my heart. It extends from the beginning bottom of my body, which is my start. In 1925, my family came to Kenya and I picked just five very important strategic positions from my family and history. If my family didn’t come here then I wouldn’t have what I have, so I’m extra-ordinarily grateful to them for having made that decision to come. It has been the backbone and structure of who I am, today. 1962-63, I’m not sure of the exact date but I think it was that period and time that my grandfather was instrumental in helping Kenya become Independent. I’m very proud of that, it creates a structure for me and my future. Who I am, and the strengths, I draw a lot from my grandfather’s positioning in the history of this country. In 1978, I was born and that obviously in my life is important; 2007/2008, I was working as a photo-journalist and I documented the witnesses of PEV and it my first time that I watched my country cry and I wept and wept, it has stayed with me forever and this is very symbolic and significant in my career as a photo-journalist because I really felt within one week I grew up, my style changed, my ability to process information changed and the way I carry myself was very much shaped by that time.

Back to my heart, this is the feet to our future. We are now in 2015 and we are at present and I want to see nothing more than the future I hold in heart for my country, for Africa and the world. I say all of those three together because I’m so in love with all of them, and I see the importance is to me for all three. The blue is what I think of myself, I’m intense, deep, and spiritual and a perfectionist. The deep earthy red is what people say of me, they are incredibly positive characteristics and I hope that I can hold onto them, because they help me stay positive about myself and often about my future.”

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